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Theses and Dissertations: RTDs

About Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

The RTD (retrospective thesis or dissertation) collection contains electronic versions of theses and dissertations previously published only in print.  UCF Library's RTD project includes all theses or dissertations published at UCF since the first thesis was published in 1972 through mid-2004, after which theses and dissertations were automatically digitized.

For more information about the project or to learn about how to get your thesis or dissertations digitized, please visit the RTD website in STARS, or contact the project coordinator.

Browse all UCF RTDs

Click here to browse all print and retrospectively scanned theses and dissertations.

Please note, any works created after 2004 were created electronically, and are available here.

FAQs

What is an RTD?

An RTD (retrospective thesis or dissertation) is an electronic version of a thesis or dissertation previously published only in print.  UCF Library's RTD project includes all theses or dissertations published at UCF since the first thesis was published in 1972 through mid-2004, after which theses and dissertations were automatically digitized.

How can I get my thesis or dissertations online?

It easy!  If you are the author, just sign the Internet Distribution Consent Agreement, either either fax it or scan and email it to us.  That's all you have to do--we take care of the rest.  If you provide contact information, we will let you know when your work is available online to view.

Why do you need my permission to scan my thesis?

We ask permission to distribute your work online because, in most cases, you (the author) own the copyright to your work.  There are some instances in which copyright was assigned to another party, such as an employer, and in that case, permission would need to be granted by the copyright holder.  According to U.S. copyright law, "Copyright protection subsists from the time the work is created in fixed form" (http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf). In other words, copyright does not have to be secured or applied for, as it is automatically granted to the creator of the work once the work is in fixed form. 

If you are unsure about the copyright status of your thesis or dissertation, contact Kerri Bottorff and she can investigate it for you.

If you have any further questions, please check out all the RTD FAQ.