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Theses and Dissertations: Submitting your ETD

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How to submit your ETD

Once you gain format approval, you will receive a set of final instructions from the College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation Office for completing the ETD process and graduation requirements, including the final upload to the submission site. For more information, please contact the thesis and dissertation editor at editor@mail.ucf.edu

ETD Dissemination Options

While UCF respects the wishes of students who would like to publish their work and/or apply for patents, it is essential for scholarly research conducted at a university to be available for dissemination. While several options are available for the release of an ETD, it is the goal of the university that all theses be available through the UCF Libraries catalog. Upon uploading the final ETD to the UCF Libraries ETD website, students, in some cases with their advisers, must choose one of the options for the availability of their ETD through UCF. Students with potential patent concerns are required to discuss the following options with their thesis adviser and indicate the availability choice on the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option electronic form, which the student submits in the myUCF Student Center.

  • For those with no patent or copyright concerns:
    • Immediate worldwide dissemination with no restrictions.
  • For those who have patent issues, dissemination options must be discussed and agreed to with your adviser. Choices are:
    • Pending dissemination of the entire work for six months for patent or other proprietary issues, with an additional six months extension available. Once the patent and proprietary issues are resolved, then immediate worldwide dissemination with no restrictions.
  • Pending dissemination of the entire work for six months for patent or other proprietary issues, with an additional six months extension available. Once the patent and proprietary issues are resolved, choosing this option allows the student to make the thesis available to the university community for the period chosen below, and then for it to be distributed via the Web beyond that time.
    • one year
    • three years*
    • five years*
  • For those who have copyright concerns, dissemination options are a student decision within the guidelines of individual departments that may have requirements for dissemination. If a department has no guidelines for dissemination, then students are free to choose one of the options below. In general, those in the sciences and engineering will choose one year while students in the arts and humanities may choose longer. Choosing this option allows the student to make the thesis available to the university community for the period chosen below, and then for it to be distributed via the Web beyond that time.
    • one year
    • three years*
    • five years*

*Does not require thesis adviser signature and approval.

What happens after you submit your ETD

The metadata for UCF theses and dissertations is harvestable from an ETD web site maintained by the UCF Libraries, ensuring wider distribution. Your ETD file(s) will physically reside at the Florida Virtual Campus and a link to your ETD will be made available based on your chosen method of distribution.  The metadata, the citation information you submit about yourself and your ETD as well as your abstract, will be made available to the following sites:  
  • UCF Libraries’ catalog
  • WorldCat
  • NDLTD (Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations)
  • Worldwide ETD Index
  • Search engines such as Google, Bing, Yahoo, Ask, etc.

An overview of the process:

1. After you submit your ETD and accompanying information via the ETD submission site, the metadata and file(s) are stored on server at UCF.

2. All information and files will be sent to the Florida Virtual Campus where a record for the catalog will be created and a permanent URL for your ETD will be generated.

3. Your citation and abstract will be stored in a harvestable collection on a server at the UCF Libraries. This information will be made available for harvesting to NDLTD, Worldwide ETD index, and search engines.

4. The catalog record is reviewed for accuracy and enhanced with subject headings.

5. Your ETD is made available based on your chosen distribution method.

What Rights Do I Have?

As soon as your work is in a tangible form (a Word document, a web site, a recording), the copyright is yours.  You own the right to:

• reproduce your work
• distribute your work
• prepare derivative works
• publicy display or perform your work
• authorize others to do any of the above

You do not have to register your work to obtain copyright, but registration can help in the event of copyright infringement or other legal issues.

You own the copyright for your life plus 70 years.

You can give away or sell any or all of your rights.  Giving up your rights may limit access to and impact of your work.

Some publishers require you to sign away your rights.  See the "What journals let me keep my rights?" section below to see publishers' copyright and self-archiving policies.

You can keep your copyright, and grant exclusive or non-exclusive licesnes so others can use your work. 

Find out more about holding on to your rights and licensing your work on the Author Addenda and Creative Commons pages of this guide.

Additional options for distributing your ETD

The University is simply dropping the mandatory requirement but in no way is hindering or prohibiting the students’ rights to have their works available in UMI/ProQuest or any other fee based or free service. The student holds the copyright to their work and can choose additional methods for publishing and archiving their thesis or dissertation at their own discretion and expense. The links below are examples of other places where you may chose to submit your work: