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Student Learning & Engagement @ UCF Libraries

a brief history of department and the Information Literacy Modules project

Information Literacy @ UCF

The Information Literacy Modules were developed as an initiative of the university's Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP).  Project goals were to “provide the direct means to support learning through instructional methods, information and technology support, and personal interaction,” including online learning modules (What if?, 2006, p. 40).

The libraries' Information Literacy & Outreach department working in collaboration with the Center for Distributed Learning (CDL) partnered as a development team to design and create each of the information literacy modules. Modules are aligned with the ACRL Information Literacy Standards, and each module was designed to include a combination of text, graphics, videos, and interactive media. Modules are also designed to include a practice and assessment sections that use "true/false questions, multiple choice questions and/or interactive simulations. Designed as supplemental learning resources, modules can be used in both face-to-face and web courses throughout the curriculum.

The modules are delivered in Obojobo, which is an authenticated system and a login is required. To request guest access, please contact Christina Wray at christina.wray@ucf.edu.  Additional information about the modules is available on the Infolit website http://infolit.ucf.edu

Usage Statistics

Usage statistics for the modules had been compiled from the start.  However, when a new reporting system in Obojobo was unveiled in May 2011, missing data from the previous years was discovered and restored.  As a result, the new, accurate statistics show a substantial increase in the use of the information literacy modules over previously reported data. 

June 2008 to July 30, 2009

  • 13,840 assessment completions by
  • 4,433 students in
  • 422 course sections taught or led by
  • 94 faculty members who created
  • 430 instances of
  • 4 information literacy modules with an average score of
  • 85.30% across all modules' summative assessments.

July 30, 2009 to June 30, 2010

  • 16,939 assessment completions by
  • 6,005 students in
  • 586 total course sections taught or led by
  • 93 faculty members who created
  • 586 instances of
  • 8 information literacy modules with an average score of
  • 89.02% across all modules' summative assessments.

July 30, 2010 to June 30, 2011

  • 22,685 assessment completions by
  • 6,469 students in
  • 710 total course sections taught or led by
  • 104 faculty members who created
  • 710 instances of
  • 12 information literacy modules with an average score of
  • 84.69% across all modules' summative assessments.

July 30, 2011 to June 30, 2012

  • 38,423 assessment completions by
  • 8,082 students in
  • 159 unique courses taught or led by
  • 160 faculty members who created
  • 1275 instances of
  • 13 information literacy modules with an average score of
  • 85.19% across all modules' summative assessments.

July 30, 2012 to June 30, 2013

  • 42,046 assessment completions by
  • 7,860 students in courses taught or led by
  • 164 faculty members who created
  • 1,317 instances of
  • 14 information literacy modules with an average score of
  • 85.71% across all modules' summative assessments.

July 30, 2013 to June 30, 2014

  • 52,759 assessment completions by
  • 9,758 students in courses taught or led by
  • 151 faculty members who created
  • 1,551 instances of
  • 15 information literacy modules with an average score of
  • 82.64% across all modules' summative assessments.

July 30, 2014 to June 30, 2015

  • 55,078 assessment completions by
  • 12,694 students in courses taught or led by
  • 184 faculty members who created
  • 1,750 instances of
  • 15 information literacy modules with an average score of
  • 83.07% across all modules' summative assessments.

July 30, 2015 to June 30, 2016

  • 56,310 assessment completions by
  • 12,529 students in courses taught or led by
  • 167 faculty members who created
  • 1,863 instances of
  • 13 information literacy modules with an average score of
  • 83.41% across all modules' summative assessments.

July 30, 2016 to June 30, 2017

  • 66,258 assessment completions by
  • 13,105 students in courses taught or led by
  • 159 faculty members who created
  • 1,714 instances of
  • 13 information literacy modules with an average score of
  • 84.25% across all modules' summative assessments.

July 30, 2017 to June 30, 2018

  • 74,218 assessment completions by
  • 13,942 students in courses taught or led by
  • 123 faculty members who created
  • 1,692 instances of
  • 13 information literacy modules with an average score of
  • 83.71% across all modules' summative assessments.

Information taken from the 2016-2017 Annual Report, p. 74 and 2012-2013 Annual Report, p. 50.

ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards

ACRL's Information Literacy Competency Standards would be the basis of UCF's Information Literacy Modules.  These standards were developed to help institutions of higher education to determine what skills students need to know, teach faculty and librarians how to assess outcomes, and serve as guidelines to measure learning when developing local information literacy programs.  Beginning in July, 2006, a team of librarians and staff from CDWS began creating a curriculum that outlined specific outcomes for each standard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Module Development

Modules are developed in four steps:

1. A Content Outline is developed by the Information Literacy Librarian, laying out the module's objective and performance skills

2. Brainstorming sessions with both the Information Literacy and Outreach (ILO) department and CDWS determine what student will know, what text and media are needed, and how to best evaluate students

3. Development of the module begins, again in partnership with ILO and CDWS, including the Assessment, Content, and Practice components

4. Usability testing of the new module is held.  Both students and faculty are invited to participate in the usability testing.

Once these steps happen, the new module can be rolled out in Obojobo.