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Video Resources

Welcome!

This guide is meant to supplement the Video Advisory Team's Video Guidelines and Best Practices document, included below and posted in the Library Videos Channel of the AllStaff Team on MSTeams. UCF Libraries videos are hosted on our UCF Libraries Vimeo channel, and you can request a video to be added to Vimeo by completing the form in the Library Videos Channel on the AllStaff Team. Other resources, including templates, are included in the Team files. Feel free to put any questions or comments about UCF Libraries' videos in the "Posts" section of the Teams channel.

Planning Your Video

Here are a few questions to consider when planning your video.

  1. What are my learning outcomes?
    1. See Bloom's taxonomy for tips for writing outcomes.
  2. Who is my audience?
  3. Is video the best medium to convey my outcomes and reach my audience?
  4. Do I need to create a video from scratch or can I use existing content
    1. Both ProQuest and EBSCO have training videos on their YouTube channels
  5. What type of video should I create?
    1. screencast: best for tutorials or demonstrating a process
    2. live action: works well for tours of physical spaces, introductions to staff or services, testimonials
    3. animated: good for explaining complex or abstract concepts

See Penn State's Instructional Video Guide for more information about selecting a type of video. 

Best Practices for Design

  • Create a script or storyboard (this will help with captioning later in the process)
  • Consider the length: keep it short (usually between 1-4 minutes)
  • Follow sound instructional design principles for multimedia (See Vanderbilt University's Effective educational videos page)
    • signaling
    • segmenting
    • weeding
    • matching modality
  • Design with accessibility in mind (See the University of Washington's Creating assessible videos page) 
    • Pay attention to text readability
    • Maintain an appropriate contrast ratio